Hardy and Inexpensive Perennial Garden Plants

I am a plant killer. I fully admit that I usually have a black thumb, but I have found several kinds of plants that are great for a garden, are generally inexpensive, and can even live through someone as negligent as me. Here are my favorite perennials.

Double Knock Out Roses

These are awesome. Double Knock Out Roses are easy to take care of and bloom in bright reds and pinks for most of the year here in Houston, TX. They even stay green during the coldest parts of our winter (25-35 degrees). And the best part is that they were created to be resistant to most insects and classic rose sicknesses like molds. I barely remember to water it, yet our bush is 3 years old, cost $9.99 when I bought it as a young seedling, and is now huge and gorgeous. I highly recommend it for any home.

Silvery SunProof Lilyturf

These stay bright green year round and also produce purple flower stalks during the summer. I like them since they can handle full throttle Texas sun. We planted our $4 lilyturf plants about 4 years ago and they are all still going strong. The purple flower stalks only show up if you water them enough, but they stay bright green with yellow stripes even when I forget to water them.

Dwarf Mondo Grass

This type of monkey grass doesn’t take over an entire space like regular monkey grass. We put a clump between each of our sunproof lilyturfs and they stay deep green all year without killing the lilyturfs. I have even seen a few people use them to completely fill in a small yard after their grass gave up. This isn’t an absolutely gorgeous plant, but it is an excellent filler and only cost us about $3 for each plant.

Holly Bush

I am in awe of my small holly bush. I bought it for $5 towards the end of a summer a few years ago. It has tripled in size, never gets droopy when I forget to water it for weeks, and is now even blooming with the classic berries it is supposed to have. This is definitely a great plant for negligent gardeners like me.

Caladiums

These only bloom during the warm months but they are hardy. I bought two for $12 a few years ago and lost one based on a very bad placement. The runoff from our heavy storms murdered it. But the other one blooms a very pretty red and green every summer, dies off above ground for our winter, and comes back like clockwork every March. It adds color but doesn’t require me to replace it every year like an annual. I appreciate that.

This combo of plants, along with a crepe myrtle, makes up everything in our front yard. The roses and crepe myrtle make up the most color other than green, but it is nice to have one of the few flower beds with any color at all after October.

What other hardy and inexpensive perennials can you think of? What should I keep in mind?

Edwin C

Edwin is a marketer, social media influencer and head writer here at Money In The 20's. He manages a large network of high quality finance blogs and social media accounts. You can connect with him via email here.

6 thoughts on “Hardy and Inexpensive Perennial Garden Plants

  • June 14, 2011 at 4:37 pm
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    I’m a big fan of the daylily. They come back each year in our garden, with more volme. They are hardy to be able to survive the heat of Virginia Beach, and they look great.

    Gardening is a great way to incorporate financial savvy principles. People spend so much money on their gardens. Thanks for the inspiration.

    Reply
    • June 15, 2011 at 5:15 pm
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      The daylily is an awesome plant! Glad you visited!

      Reply
  • June 15, 2011 at 11:34 pm
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    I love a good cactus and aloe plant. They stay green all year round even when I forget about them for weeks. Also aloe comes in very handy when I burnt myself during my attempts at cooking.

    Reply
    • June 17, 2011 at 8:04 pm
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      Hmmm…aloe sounds good!

      Reply
  • June 16, 2011 at 4:59 am
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    Great post! A truly successful garden will be one you enjoy being in so make sure there are plenty of plants you love in your garden.

    Reply

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